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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
and bill clinton. all of our coverage and behind the scenes photographs are available on our website c- span.org. let's take you back to january 2009. [crowd chanting "obama"] >> thank you. thank you. my fellow citizens, i stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. i thank president bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition. 44 americans have now taken the presidential oath. the words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. yet, every so often, the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. at these moments, america has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because we the people have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents. so it has been, so it must be with this generation of americans. that we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. our nation is at war, again
in the way the modern president does. it happened to ronald reagan, it happened to bill clinton, george bush. and that is, obama fatigues. three years from now, people will be writing columns about obama fatigue, just as they did about clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. wetoday's modern age, could have more than two terms for any president? you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term pr
for bill clinton, would work on the major speeches up to the last minute. i understand that president obama has some of those tendencies as well. this is such a big moment for the president that he has to make sure he fine tunes it. it is his voice. speech writers can give him a great draft but i think at this moment he's putting his final touches on it himself. host: we've been talking this morning about second inaugural addresses and a lot of references to lincoln's second saturday much more famous than his first address but that is the exception. guest: i suppose it is. there aren't a lot of inaugural addresses out there. but lincoln's definitely stands out. i'm trying to think offhand whose president's second inaugural address resinated more than the first. possibly my president, george bush. because it was such a different picture at the second term than at the beginning of his first. host: both of you bush, 43, president blin's second inaugural address was longer than the first. guest: yes, we had quite a challenge with president clinton. as most people know, he tends to like to speak
in contrast to a bill clinton or some of others. but even the president who is come in with very high ratings usually tend to plun nj the second term. twigt eisenhower, one of the most popular presidents ever in american history, by 1957 late and 15958, his ratings were down to about 40%, which was very low in those days. in a way it's an index to the fact the second term president is doing well because you want to see him spending political capital. if he leaves really popular, it may mean he hasn't done enough. >> since world war ii only presidents reagan and clinton went up in popularity? >> indeed. >> a hard act to follow and statistically you're not looking at necessarily more popularity. >> absolutely. >> people come in for a second term and think, okay, now i can relax, i don't have to campaign anymore and i can go do my business. the problem is they are focused on their legacy and things always go wrong in the second term. always, always, always. there's not a president you can mention. they have to sort of stay stay on their toes. they can't relax and just say this is my second term,
that we can do it again. >> andrea: history lesson. it was the southern democrats, bill clinton, born at the time of lincoln in the state of arkansas probably would have opposed what lincoln was trying to do. so, again -- >> dana: or he would have been a republican. >> andrea: the left trying to co-op what the right has done with president. >> kimberly: disgusting. >> dana: there is politics in hollywood and politics in d.c. i prefer them not mixed up on the play. this is the segment that i loved when costner won for "hatfield and mccoys." it was classy and from the heart. >> first time i came in this room i was unknown actor and red carpet, i walked op it and the bulbs were going and flashing and the photographers yelling at the actors. to look at them, nobody said anything to me. it's a great night to celebrate but more importantly get a chance illuminate movies people might not have ever seen now and now they will. >> dana: i agree. great thing about the goldp globes. you add to the list of movies you want to see. >> kimberly: i think so. i have a few written down. >> eric: my favo
as petraeus is enough to team public and what we got rid george washington? bill clinton is not the first and the worst. and there, done that, a long history of it. it pains me to say even abraham lincoln visited a. say it isn't so, but it happened. the details on matters itchy. there's not a lot of letters written about this, but lincoln's best friend was joshua speed and speed was perhaps as dashing and from unlucky with the ladies as lincoln was homely and awkward unlucky in romance. they always called one another by their last names. speed, lincoln. speed and that is linking his door and didn't have a place to stay, so what can let speed stay upstairs at the general store. during the friendship, speakers using services of a professional woman. you imagine lincoln upstairs with a pillow over his head trying to mind his own business as speed is doing his business. he basically says that after the woman. it's been too long. on the abraham lincoln would do this. it appears i cannot speak for a letter of introduction. with a professional women. i don't mean agriculture appeared as an occup
president bill clinton gave the film its most ringing endorsement yet saying that is shows how all of the great decisions in american history were forged in, quote, a cauldron of principle and compromise. now, that's a lovely phrase, of course, but is it true? let's bring in thomas frank of harper's magazine. good afternoon, tom. >> hey, martin. >> thank you for looking in my direction. now, tom, what is wrong with you because everyone from david brooks to bill clinton is in love with this film, but you say in your latest column, "lincoln" is a move ni that makes viewers feel noble at first but on reflection the sentiment feels hollow. it's not only a hackneyed film but a mendacious one as well. what is wrong with you? >> i don't know, martin. it's something -- it's congenital or something. i'm always like this. i'm always going the wrong direction, but it doesn't surprise me that bill clinton is going to celebrate something like this. i mean, come on. this is a man that invented triangulation. and you think of all the great triumphs of triangulation, of bipartisanship in the clint
that happened was with bill clinton. we will share with you some thoughts by jerry is joining us from detroit on the democrats' line, good morning. caller: what makes this inauguration so much more significant that it is taking place on martin luther king jr. birthday. dr. king was certainly a hero of mine and certainly to president obama. and certainly to anyone who believes in equality and social justice. host: on the republican line, steve is joining us from virginia, good morning. caller: is important to look at what has been accomplished in the first four years. the values the -- the value of united states dollar has been reduced by 50% and the value of gold has gone up. everybody on welfare has half as much money to use and all the contributors have golden safety deposit boxes. the rich got richer, and the poor have gotten poorer, let's hope the second term as a little bit more appropriate. host: thanks for the call. from "the national journal "-- the richard nixon inaugurals parade a pesticide to get rid of pigeons. calvin coolidge was sworn in by his own father and ulysses s. grant wa
. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again, after already making history four years ago. in front of 2 million spectators. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. i'll see you from washington with a special edition tomorrow night. and we'll all see you here on monday. good night.
president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than a second term. ushering the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again since already making history four years ago. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. right here. i'll see you from washington tomorrow night. good night.
lbj and trying to get drinks with -- how come you're not like bill clinton and not inviting mitch mcconnell and harry reid to camp david. how come you're not like ronald reagan and throwing back whiskey with tip o'neill. it is that stuff, as you've been noting and he pointed out, he does this but i think this is where there's a little bit of disconnect. i think there are people on the outside and look at what other presidents -- and say, why don't you do this more? the white house will say, guess what, people used to say the same thing about clinton and reagan. my guess is the truth's somewhere in between. it's not exactly as if the president uses his golf game to lobby members of congress, he doesn't. not as if he has a card game once a month he's bringing over the leader. he doesn't do things like that. is that part of the job description? >> the president said at the press conference yesterday, he has played golf with john boehner, does a good golf game. it didn't help in the negotiations. boehner keeps refusing invitations to multiple state dinners. there seems to be a problem wh
about second term curses that have brought down richard nixon, hampered ronald reagan, bill clinton. people forget reagan was able to get tax reform, bill clinton was able to get a balanced budget. certainly a big opportunity for the president but fully aware in the white house, a lot of challenges ahead as well, jenna. >> certainly not challenges for a father. nice to see the first family, ed, and how much the girls have grown up over the last four years. what we're looking at for the president tomorrow besides the hair styles and what everybody is wearing at the inauguration is what is he going to say? what will be the address to the nation tomorrow? you mentioned some policy challenges ahead. what are you hearing about tomorrow's address and how that might set the table, if you will, for the years to come? >> true. what i'm hearing is the state of the union address next month is really where the president will go with a deeper dive on policy, whether it be gun control, immigration reform, the debt ceiling debate. tomorrow's broad scene. his senior advisor will talk about bringing
of american progress by the former chief of staff of bill clinton and they have a 13-point list of gun control proposals that they thought through many years ago they're handing to the white house and apparently, according to the post, the white house likely to act on a lot of these. >> we can't get through all 14, universal background check, making military grade assault weapons, ban those, high capacity magazines we do that, and modernize data systems, track gun sales and enforcing existing laws, pretty standard enough, but a list of 13. >> alisyn: yeah, one of the things they are suggesting which will probably anger many people listening, if the president can't get widespread support for some of these proposals, that he act on executive order, in other words, unilaterally, and that would be unfortunate. who knows what the vice-president is going to propose on tuesday when he comes out with proposals, if it turned out that the president were just to steam roll over people and act unilaterally, that, that feels wrong, because if there was ever a time nationally that people are open and recept
. >> that was hillary clinton's husband. oh man, that was exciting. >> it was bill rodham clinton. >> that looks like johnny depp. it is actually tina fey in a disguise earlier. when bill clinton introduced steven spielberg's cliff from "lincoln"hollywood went wild. steven spielberg gave the former president a big salute. >>gretchen: president clinton was talking about being president and maybe we can have action on capitol hill similar to what lincoln did. if you've seen "lincoln" i think one of the biggest take is you actually remember it was republicans were the ones trying to eradicate slavery. it's interesting how times have changed and issues shifted and perceptions have also changed. >>peter: he was talking about principle and compromise are the hallmarks of american competence. >>steve: jodie foster has been in the movie-making business since she was three years old. last night she received the cecil b. demille award. she had a long and a bit of a rambling chat about her life, talking about how she's 50 now, she's single. she saluted her mother, her partner, her children. she's really been ou
with ronald reagan, bill clinton and dwight eisenhower. >> the greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker. this honor beacon's americans the chance to lead the world at last out of the valley of term oil and onto the high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since the dawn of civilization. >> making the benefits of scientific examinations and -- scientific advances for the improvement of undeveloped areas. story.ic radio's back live saturday morning at 11:00 eastern, part of three days of american history tv rights to inauguration day on c-span 3. >> in 1981, ronald reagan was inaugurated. he had won the 1980 election against jimmy carter. a major issue in the campaign was the iran hostage crisis. as president reagan was giving his address, they were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath. raise your right hand and repeat after me. i robberies in do solemnly swear -- >> i,-- ronald reagan do solemnly swear -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states -- >> and
't change the paths, but he can go forward and accomplish great things. just ask bill clinton. i have low testosterone. there, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel.
they found out he wasn't wearing that hat. >> bill clinton showed up, too. >> did he? >> yeah. >> he got the win. more importantly, duke lost to the wolf pack. they were undefeated and michigan lost to ohio state. so then you saw the falcons finally got off. >> and the patriots won? >> the patriots looked pretty good. >> it was a one-point gain, right? >> it was 30 seconds. anyway, we'll be back. i had to end with some sports after that hollywood dribble. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. dow looks like it would open up about 15 points higher. s&p 500 would open up almost 2 points higher. the nasdaq is off slightly, may
inaugural speeches from the last 60 years starting with ronald reagan, bill clinton from 1993, dwilingt eisenhower from 1957, harry truman from 1949, then john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush, jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night with george w. bush's speech. see ten inaugural speeches from ten past presidents on c-span. >> up next senate his torn don richy gave a historical perspective on inaugurations describing how various treated the day and how so help me god became part of the ceremony. this is about an hour. >> now there is a phrase that journalists use a lot. it's called a go to guy. and i think you know what that means. it means somebody who knows a lot about something that the journalists can go to and get from that person reliable information. and there are not that many go to guys around. there are a lot of people in this town who have opinions. there are a lot of people in this town who are incredibly glib. but there are not that many people who are so fundamentally immersed in a subject. and an important subject that journalists and others, ack demics are attracte
to put that tent with clinton. if you were getting hurricanes' every five or six years he would get a bill to there. the storm system in the 30's of any magnitude it made perfect sense when you get it. we're not going to rebuild that the way. so from the science perspective here is my asked. who is making the decisions about where we build, how we build, and building codes. if you're not familiar with the devastates and will take this to the federal government, no. this is that decisions are made every day where risk exposure occurs. on the day-to-day transactional basis you probably don't really see this, but this is where decisions are made about where we will kick -- where we build, how we build, the types of building codes we're going to enforce, yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure generate revenue. how the local officials to their revenue is jobs and growth. have you ever seen anyone running for office seminar committee to give small? it's always jobs and growth. that is the mantra. yet they're having to make decisions that oftentimes are short-term, very limi
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)